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monkeym.pdf
monkeym.pdfTaming the Monkey Mind3087 viewsCheng Wei-an. Tr. by Dharma Master Suddhisukha

Taming the Monkey Mind is a guide to Pure Land practice. It deals specifically with the main practice of the Pure Land School - Buddha Recitation - and covers both the noumenal and phenomenal aspects of that practice. The treatise is accompanied by the detailed commentary of an Elder Master of the Zen and Pure Land lineages. Readers not familiar with Pure Land theory may wish to begin with Dr. J.C. Cleary's introduction.
Jan 01, 1970
chandew.pdf
chandew.pdfThe Sweet Dews of Ch'an4334 viewsReverend Cheng Kuan

Ch'an or Zen is the outcome of meditation. There are two 'right'or 'highest' purposes of Ch'an. The first purpose is to achieve Dhyana. Dhyana is a combination of relaxation, concentration and calmness or tranquility. The second purpose is, using your very composed and tranquil mind, to observe clearly all the dharmas or phenomena externally and internally. As an outcome of Dhyana, you will be able to observe these phenomena very clearly because your mental mirror is very clear, for there are no more disturbances to veil it. Out of these observations will come Transcendental Wisdom, which in Sanskrit is called Prajna.
Jan 01, 1970
gates_of_chan.pdf
gates_of_chan.pdfThe Gates of Ch'an Buddhism3587 viewsVenerable Jing Hui

Bodhidharma's Gate: Ch'an (Zen) in fact is an impregnable fortress, without a gate to enter. Suppose there is really a gate, that gate would simply be a method of training to be taken up in the Ch'an tradition. That is why when a monk asked Master Zhao Zhou(778-897: "Has a dog Buddha-nature or not?" Master Zhao Zhou retorted: "Wu". Later on,this Gongan (koan) formed part of a specific approach in the Ch'an School. The author,Venerable Jing Hui is a Ch'an Master and a vice-president of the Buddhist Association of China.
Jan 01, 1970
chanmed1.pdf
chanmed1.pdfFundamentals of Ch'an Meditation Practice5364 viewsTing Chen, Tr. Master Lok To

The Fundamentals of (Ch'an) Meditation Practice by Ting Chen. Originally, one's own mind and nature are pure, and there is nothing to accept and nothing to refuse; there is neither existence nor nonexistence; there is only clear understanding without attachment and with no dwelling. One who wants to know the no-attachment, no-dwelling mind can find it through meditation, because it is only then that the mind does not think of right and wrong, of good and evil or of self and others.
Jan 01, 1970
undrstnd.pdf
undrstnd.pdfTo Understand Buddhism3173 viewsThe teachings of Master Chin Kung are based on true sincerity towards others; purity of mind; equality in everything we see; proper understanding of ourselves and our environment; compassion by helping others in a wise and unconditional way. See through to the truth of impermanence; let go of all wandering thoughts and attachments; accord with conditions to go along with the environment. Be mindful of Amitabha Buddha - wishing to reach the Pure Land and follow His Teachings.Jan 01, 1970
artliv12.pdf
artliv12.pdfThe Art of Living14611 viewsThe Art of Living with Ven. Master Chin Kung, a Master of the Pure Land School of Buddhism. The Art of Living has chapters on: The Education of Buddha Shakyamuni, our Original Teacher; The Four Kinds of Buddhism Today; How Homemakers Can Cultivate the Bodhisattva Way in Daily Life, and an excellent Question and Answer section. Included is a glossary and a contact list of Ven. Master Chin Kung's teaching centres around the world.Jan 01, 1970
only_help.pdf
only_help.pdfOnly We Can Help Ourselves2833 viewsKamma is an interesting subject because it concerns everyone and there are many different aspects of it. There are many natural laws that govern our lives but the most important is the law of kamma-vipaka. In a discourse (A.N. 6.63) the Buddha said, Intention, monks, is kamma I say. Having willed, one acts through body, speech and mind. This means that intentional action is kamma, and vipaka is the result or effects of it. The result may ripen immediately, later in this life or in a future life.Jan 01, 1970
bd_students.pdf
bd_students.pdfBuddha Dhamma for University Students6678 viewsThis book is the results of two talks given by Ajahn Buddhadasa in January 1966 to students at Thammasat University, Bangkok. Ajahn Buddhadasa always has tried to set both young and old straight as to what Buddhism really teaches. He goes back to the original principles pointed out by the Buddha, explaining these simply and directly, and showing that their relevance is timeless.Jan 01, 1970
nat_cure.pdf
nat_cure.pdfThe Natural Cure for Spiritual Disease2543 viewsThe Natural Cure for Spiritual Disease is a guide to Buddhist science, it includes three talks given in 1986 by this world-renowned Thai Buddhist teacher: 'The Scientific Cure of Spiritual Disease', 'The Use of Dhamma' and 'New Life of Peace'. Venerable Buddhadasa is well known for the readiness with which he gives non-literal interpretations of Buddhist texts. He does not hesitate to reject as naive a word-for-word interpretation that has no bearing on real life.Jan 01, 1970
buddasa.pdf
buddasa.pdfHandbook For Mankind14636 viewsAs a guide for newcomers to the Buddha Dhamma (the Truth which the Buddha awakened to and subsequently taught), this book is an invaluable guide. In it are contained the essential teachings of Buddhism. The Handbook is especially useful for those who approach the Buddha's teaching not as a subject for scholarly study but as a means to understand and ennoble their lives. It includes chapters on 'Looking at Buddhism' and the 'True Nature of Things'.Jan 01, 1970
1212 files on 122 page(s) 119

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