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Beginners2ed_28Buddhanet29.pdf
Beginners2ed_28Buddhanet29.pdfMahaSatipatthana Sutta: Great Discourse on Four-Fold Establishment of Mindfulness2053 viewsThis book explains Satipatthana or mindfulness practice by going directly and referring to this Discourse, which the Buddha originally expounded to the people of Kurus. So here we return to the basic orthodox Discourse spoken by the Buddha as a guide. In this way you gain a complete understanding of what the Buddha really taught. You can also gauge whether you are on the right track or if there is any missing part in your practice that you might need to include.55555
(1 votes)
8_Precepts_Letter_Middle-Way.pdf
8_Precepts_Letter_Middle-Way.pdfEight Precepts Letter to Middle-Way957 viewsA letter from Jacquetta Gomes (Bodhicarini Upasika Jayasili), BGKT Buddhist Group of Kendal (Theravada), in response to Roger Farrington, ‘Should Buddhists be Teetotallers?’, The Middle Way: Journal of The Buddhist Society, 85 (3) November 2010, pp.167–70. The letter explains that Ajivatthamaka Sila (Eight Precepts with Right Livelihood as the Eighth clarify the alcohol issue and explain how alcohol is included in the DKP (Dasa Kusala Kamma-patha) Ten Wholesome Courses of Action.55555
(1 votes)
DP_Eight_Lifetime_Precepts.pdf
DP_Eight_Lifetime_Precepts.pdfEight Lifetime Precepts667 viewsEight Lifetime Precepts are an expansion of Ajivatthamaka Sila. The first seven Precepts are the same but the eighth Precept is an amalgamation of the eighth Precept of Ajivatthamaka Sila and the fifth Precept of Panca Sila (The Five Precepts): I undertake the training rule [Precept] to abstain from wrong livelihood; and drinks and drugs that cause heedlessness.55555
(1 votes)
The_Eight_Discernments_of_Eminent_Men_Sutra.pdf
The_Eight_Discernments_of_Eminent_Men_Sutra.pdfThe Eight Discernments of Eminent Men Sutra2421 viewsA new translation of the 佛說八大人覺經 (commonly known as the Eight realizations of Great Beings Sutra), with added commentary from the Pureland perspective.55555
(1 votes)
samadhi_in_buddhism.pdf
samadhi_in_buddhism.pdfSamadhi in Buddhism1187 views55555
(1 votes)
good_evil_and_beyond_kamma_in_the_buddha_s_teaching.pdf
good_evil_and_beyond_kamma_in_the_buddha_s_teaching.pdfGood Evil and Beyond: Kamma in the Buddha's teaching1984 views55555
(1 votes)
wheel001.pdf
wheel001.pdfThe Seven Factors of Enlightenment1088 viewsThe Tipitaka, the Buddhist canon, is replete with references to the factors of enlightenment expounded by the Enlightened One on different occasions under different circumstances. In the Book of the Kindred Sayings, V (Saíyutta Nikáya, Mahá Vagga) we find a special section under the title Bojjhaóga Saíyutta wherein the Buddha discourses on the Seven Factors of Enlightenment in diverse ways. In this section we read a series of three discourses or sermons recited by Buddhists since the time of the Buddha as a protection (paritta or pirit) against pain, disease, and adversity.55555
(1 votes)
bl109.pdf
bl109.pdfPositive Response - How to Meet Evil With Good1777 viewsThis booklet contains a collection of short suttas spoken by the Buddha and a passage from the Visuddhimagga, each preceded by a brief introduction by the translator. The unifying theme of these pieces may be called a positive response in dealing with provocative people and situations. The texts set forth practical techniques taught by the Buddha for overcoming resentment, hatred and other such pollutants, and for cultivating such elevating mental qualities as good will, amity and compassion. For anyone intent on spiritual development these practical instructions will help to cleanse the mind and to unfold its great hidden potentials.55555
(1 votes)
truth_of_rebirth.pdf
truth_of_rebirth.pdfThe Truth of Rebirth: And Why It Matters For Buddhist Practice956 viewsRebirth has always been a central teaching in the Buddhist tradition. The earliest records in the Pali Canon (MN 26; MN 36) indicate that the Buddha, prior to his awakening, searched for a happiness not subject to the vagaries of repeated birth, ageing, illness, and death. On the night of his awakening, two of the three knowledges leading to his release from suffering focused on the topic of rebirth. The first showed his own many previous lives; the second, depicting the general pattern of beings dying and being reborn throughout the cosmos, showed the connection between rebirth and karma, or action. When he did finally attain release from suffering, he recognized that he had achieved his goal because he had touched a dimension that not only was free from birth, but also had freed him from ever being reborn again.55555
(1 votes)
9.jpg
9.jpg9. Ten Oxherding Picture760 viewsRETURNING TO THE SOURCE55555
(1 votes)
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