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bl109.pdf
bl109.pdfPositive Response - How to Meet Evil With Good1717 viewsThis booklet contains a collection of short suttas spoken by the Buddha and a passage from the Visuddhimagga, each preceded by a brief introduction by the translator. The unifying theme of these pieces may be called a positive response in dealing with provocative people and situations. The texts set forth practical techniques taught by the Buddha for overcoming resentment, hatred and other such pollutants, and for cultivating such elevating mental qualities as good will, amity and compassion. For anyone intent on spiritual development these practical instructions will help to cleanse the mind and to unfold its great hidden potentials.Jun 16, 2014
bmc2.pdf
bmc2.pdfThe Buddhist Monastic Code II1264 viewsThe Khandhaka Rules Translated and Explained

This volume is an attempt to give an organized, detailed account of the training rules found in the Khandhakas that govern the life of bhikkhus, together with the traditions that have grown up around them. It is a companion to The Buddhist Monastic Code, Volume One (BMC1), which offers a similar treatment of the Patimokkha training rules.
Jun 16, 2014
udana.pdf
udana.pdfUdana: Exclamations754 viewsThe role of the Udana within the context of the Pali Canon is to focus on the values and principles—“meaning” in the larger sense of the term—that underlie the Buddha’s teachings. This point can be seen clearly in how each udana is organized. It begins with a narrative of an event or series of events, followed (with a few variations) by the formula: “Then, on realizing the significance/meaning (attha) of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed.” This, in turn, is followed by a spontaneous exclamation—a poem, a passage of prose, or a combination of the two—in which the Buddha expresses what that meaning or significance is.Jun 14, 2014
strength.pdf
strength.pdfInner Strength & Parting Gifts: Talks by Ajaan Lee Dhammadharo746 viewsThe sixteen talks translated here are actually reconstructions of Ajaan Lee’s talks made by one of his followers - a nun, Arun Abhivanna - based on notes she made while listening to him teach. With a few exceptions - the talks dated 1958 and 1959, which were printed after Ajaan Lee’s death - all were checked and approved by Ajaan Lee and printed in a volume entitled, The Way to Practice Insight Meditation, Collected from Four Years’ Sermons.Jun 14, 2014
truth_of_rebirth.pdf
truth_of_rebirth.pdfThe Truth of Rebirth: And Why It Matters For Buddhist Practice928 viewsRebirth has always been a central teaching in the Buddhist tradition. The earliest records in the Pali Canon (MN 26; MN 36) indicate that the Buddha, prior to his awakening, searched for a happiness not subject to the vagaries of repeated birth, ageing, illness, and death. On the night of his awakening, two of the three knowledges leading to his release from suffering focused on the topic of rebirth. The first showed his own many previous lives; the second, depicting the general pattern of beings dying and being reborn throughout the cosmos, showed the connection between rebirth and karma, or action. When he did finally attain release from suffering, he recognized that he had achieved his goal because he had touched a dimension that not only was free from birth, but also had freed him from ever being reborn again.Jun 14, 2014
skill-in-questions.pdf
skill-in-questions.pdfSkill in Questions: How The Buddha Taught690 viewsThis is a book about discernment in action, centered on the Buddha’s strategic use of discernment in framing and responding to questions. The idea for this book was born more than a decade ago from reading a number of Buddha’s discourses. The first was SN 44:10, in which he refused to answer the question of whether there is or is not a self. This discourse called attention to the fact that the Buddha had clear ideas about which questions his teachings were meant to answer, and which ones they weren’t. I realized that if I wanted to understand and get the best use out of his teaching on not-self, I had to find the questions to which this teaching was a response and not take it out of context. Jun 14, 2014
shapeofsuffering.pdf
shapeofsuffering.pdfThe Shape of Suffering: A Study of Dependent Co-arising735 viewsThe Buddha devoted his life, after his Awakening, to showing a reliable way to the end of stress. In summarizing the whole of his teaching, he said: “Both formerly & now, it is only stress that I describe, and the cessation of stress.” SN 22:86. These were the issues he taught for 45 years. In some cases, he would give a succinct explanation of stress and its cessation. In others, he would explain them in more detail. His most detailed explanation is called dependent co-arising—Paticca Samuppada. This detailed summary of the causal factors leading up to stress shows why the experience of suffering and stress can be so bewildering, for the interaction among these factors can be very complex. The body of this book is devoted to explaining these factors and their interactions, to show how they can provide focus to a path of practice leading to the ending of stress.Jun 14, 2014
refuge.pdf
refuge.pdfRefuge: An Introduction to the Buddha, Dhamma & Sangha748 viewsThe refuges in Buddhism - both on the internal and on the external levels - are the Buddha, Dhamma, and Sangha, also known as the Triple Gem. They are called gems both because they are valuable and because, in ancient times, gems were believed to have protective powers. The Triple Gem outdoes other gems in this respect because its protective powers can be put to the test and can lead further than those of any physical gem, all the way to absolute freedom from uncertainties of the realm of ageing, illness, and death.Jun 14, 2014
perfections.pdf
perfections.pdfThe Ten Perfections1080 viewsFor people in the modern world facing the issue of how to practice the Dhamma in daily life, The Ten Perfections provide a useful framework for how to do it. When you view life as an opportunity to develop these ten qualities - generosity, virtue, renunciation, discernment, persistence, endurance, truth, determination, good will, and equanimity - you develop a fruitful attitude toward your daily activities so that any skilful activity or relationship, undertaken wisely and in a balanced way, becomes part of the practice.

Passages in this guide are drawn from the Pali Canon and from the teachings of Ajaan Lee Dhammadharo.
Jun 14, 2014
paradoxofbecoming.pdf
paradoxofbecoming.pdfThe Paradox of Becoming697 viewsThe topic of becoming, although it features one major paradox, contains other paradoxes as well. Not the least of these is the fact that, although becoming is one of the most important concepts in the Buddha’s teachings, there is no full-scale treatment of it in the English language. This book is an attempt to fill that lack.

The importance of becoming is evident from the role it plays in the Four Noble Truths, particularly in the second: Suffering and stress are caused by any form of craving that leads to becoming. Thus the end of suffering must involve the end of becoming.
Jun 14, 2014
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