Buddhist eLibrary - An Online Digitl Resource Library Home :: Login
 
 
Home About Contact Admin Choose a language
eBook Library Image Library Audio Library Video Library
 
 
Partners
Launch Mobile Site
Buddhist eLibrary Feature: Buddhist Studies
Links
exabytes network
Home > eBook Library > Theravada Texts > General

noinnercore.pdf
noinnercore.pdfNo Inner Core1452 viewsAnatta is a Pali word consisting of a negative prefix, "an" meaning not, plus atta, soul, and is most literally translated as no-soul. The word atta, however, has a wide range of meanings, and some of those meanings cross over into the fields of psychology, philosophy, and everyday terminology, as, for example, when atta can mean self, being, ego, and personality. Therefore, we will examine and elucidate the wide range of meanings which atta can signify in order to determine exactly what the Buddha denied when He proclaimed that He teaches anatt?, that is, when He denied the existence of atta. We will examine both Buddhist and non-Buddhist definitions of the term soul, and we will also examine modern definitions of terms such as ego and self.
nutshell.pdf
nutshell.pdfBuddhism in a Nutshell1762 viewsThe Story of the Buddha; The Teachings (Dhamma) is it a philosophy? Is Buddhism a religion? Is Buddhism as Ethical system? Some salient features of Buddhism. Karma or the Law of Moral Causation. Rebirth. Dependent Arising (Paticca Samuppada). Anatta or Soul-lessness. Nibanna and The Path to Nibbana.
paradoxofbecoming.pdf
paradoxofbecoming.pdfThe Paradox of Becoming759 viewsThe topic of becoming, although it features one major paradox, contains other paradoxes as well. Not the least of these is the fact that, although becoming is one of the most important concepts in the Buddha’s teachings, there is no full-scale treatment of it in the English language. This book is an attempt to fill that lack.

The importance of becoming is evident from the role it plays in the Four Noble Truths, particularly in the second: Suffering and stress are caused by any form of craving that leads to becoming. Thus the end of suffering must involve the end of becoming.
perfections.pdf
perfections.pdfThe Ten Perfections1193 viewsFor people in the modern world facing the issue of how to practice the Dhamma in daily life, The Ten Perfections provide a useful framework for how to do it. When you view life as an opportunity to develop these ten qualities - generosity, virtue, renunciation, discernment, persistence, endurance, truth, determination, good will, and equanimity - you develop a fruitful attitude toward your daily activities so that any skilful activity or relationship, undertaken wisely and in a balanced way, becomes part of the practice.

Passages in this guide are drawn from the Pali Canon and from the teachings of Ajaan Lee Dhammadharo.
refuge.pdf
refuge.pdfRefuge: An Introduction to the Buddha, Dhamma & Sangha818 viewsThe refuges in Buddhism - both on the internal and on the external levels - are the Buddha, Dhamma, and Sangha, also known as the Triple Gem. They are called gems both because they are valuable and because, in ancient times, gems were believed to have protective powers. The Triple Gem outdoes other gems in this respect because its protective powers can be put to the test and can lead further than those of any physical gem, all the way to absolute freedom from uncertainties of the realm of ageing, illness, and death.
roots_goodevil.pdf
roots_goodevil.pdfThe Roots of Good and Evil1413 viewsGreed, hatred, and delusion - these are the three bad roots in us. Conversely the good ones are non-greed (i.e generosity), non-hatred (love), and non-delusion (wisdom). All our troubles and suffering stem essentially from the bad roots while our joy and happiness comes from the good ones. It is important to know and understand these roots if we are going to make an end of suffering and attain true peace and happiness. This book explains in a penetrative way the nature of these six roots. It contains discourses of the Buddha on the subject together with traditional commentarial explanations.
shapeofsuffering.pdf
shapeofsuffering.pdfThe Shape of Suffering: A Study of Dependent Co-arising797 viewsThe Buddha devoted his life, after his Awakening, to showing a reliable way to the end of stress. In summarizing the whole of his teaching, he said: “Both formerly & now, it is only stress that I describe, and the cessation of stress.” SN 22:86. These were the issues he taught for 45 years. In some cases, he would give a succinct explanation of stress and its cessation. In others, he would explain them in more detail. His most detailed explanation is called dependent co-arising—Paticca Samuppada. This detailed summary of the causal factors leading up to stress shows why the experience of suffering and stress can be so bewildering, for the interaction among these factors can be very complex. The body of this book is devoted to explaining these factors and their interactions, to show how they can provide focus to a path of practice leading to the ending of stress.
skill-in-questions.pdf
skill-in-questions.pdfSkill in Questions: How The Buddha Taught761 viewsThis is a book about discernment in action, centered on the Buddha’s strategic use of discernment in framing and responding to questions. The idea for this book was born more than a decade ago from reading a number of Buddha’s discourses. The first was SN 44:10, in which he refused to answer the question of whether there is or is not a self. This discourse called attention to the fact that the Buddha had clear ideas about which questions his teachings were meant to answer, and which ones they weren’t. I realized that if I wanted to understand and get the best use out of his teaching on not-self, I had to find the questions to which this teaching was a response and not take it out of context.
strength.pdf
strength.pdfInner Strength & Parting Gifts: Talks by Ajaan Lee Dhammadharo801 viewsThe sixteen talks translated here are actually reconstructions of Ajaan Lee’s talks made by one of his followers - a nun, Arun Abhivanna - based on notes she made while listening to him teach. With a few exceptions - the talks dated 1958 and 1959, which were printed after Ajaan Lee’s death - all were checked and approved by Ajaan Lee and printed in a volume entitled, The Way to Practice Insight Meditation, Collected from Four Years’ Sermons.
taste-freedom.pdf
taste-freedom.pdfA Taste of Freedom1629 viewsVenerable Ajahn Chah always gave his talks in simple, everyday language. His objective was to clarify the Dhamma, not to confuse his listeners with an overload of information. Consequently the talks presented here have been rendered into correspondingly simple English. The aim has been to present Ajahn Chah's teaching in both the spirit and the letter. In 1976 Venerable Ajahn Chah was invited to England together with Ajahn Sumedho, the outcome of which was eventually the establishment of the first branch monastery of Wat Pa Pong outside of Thailand. Since then, further branch monasteries have been established in England, Switzerland, Australia, New Zealand and Italy.
41 files on 5 page(s) 3

Social Bookmarks