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Home > eBook Library > Theravada Texts > General

teachings_chah.pdf
teachings_chah.pdfThe Teachings of Ajahn Chah1528 viewsThe following Dhamma books of Ajahn Chah have been included in this collection of Ajahn Chah's Dhamma talks: Bodhinyana (1982); A Taste of Freedom (fifth impression.2002); Living Dhamma (1992); Food for the Heart (1992); The Path to Peace (1996); Clarity of Insight (2000); Unshakeable Peace (2003); Everything is Teaching Us (2004). Also some as yet unpublished talks have been included in the last section called `More Dhamma Talks'. We hope our efforts in compiling this collection of Dhamma talks of Ajahn Chah will be of benefit. (Wat Pah Nanachat)
thera-chifuner.pdf
thera-chifuner.pdfTheravadin Buddhist Chinese Funeral1242 viewsGenerally, a Chinese funeral is a mixture of Taoist, Confucian and Buddhist rites. How then should a Theravadin Buddhist funeral be conducted? Venerable Suvanno, a respected and senior Theravadin Buddhist monk of Chinese descent explains how a Theravadin Buddhist Chinese funeral may be conducted.
tree-forest.pdf
tree-forest.pdfA Tree in the Forest1728 viewsPeople have asked me about my practice. How do I prepare my mind for meditation? There is nothing special. I just keep it where it always is. They ask. Then are you an Arahant? Do I know? I am like a tree in the forest, full of leaves, blossoms and fruit. Birds come to eat and nest, and animals seek rest in the shade. Yet the tree does not know itself. It follows its own nature. It is as it is. - Ajahn Chah.
truth_of_rebirth.pdf
truth_of_rebirth.pdfThe Truth of Rebirth: And Why It Matters For Buddhist Practice1004 viewsRebirth has always been a central teaching in the Buddhist tradition. The earliest records in the Pali Canon (MN 26; MN 36) indicate that the Buddha, prior to his awakening, searched for a happiness not subject to the vagaries of repeated birth, ageing, illness, and death. On the night of his awakening, two of the three knowledges leading to his release from suffering focused on the topic of rebirth. The first showed his own many previous lives; the second, depicting the general pattern of beings dying and being reborn throughout the cosmos, showed the connection between rebirth and karma, or action. When he did finally attain release from suffering, he recognized that he had achieved his goal because he had touched a dimension that not only was free from birth, but also had freed him from ever being reborn again.
udana.pdf
udana.pdfUdana: Exclamations875 viewsThe role of the Udana within the context of the Pali Canon is to focus on the values and principles—“meaning” in the larger sense of the term—that underlie the Buddha’s teachings. This point can be seen clearly in how each udana is organized. It begins with a narrative of an event or series of events, followed (with a few variations) by the formula: “Then, on realizing the significance/meaning (attha) of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed.” This, in turn, is followed by a spontaneous exclamation—a poem, a passage of prose, or a combination of the two—in which the Buddha expresses what that meaning or significance is.
volition.pdf
volition.pdfVolition and the Law of Kamma1620 viewsWhat is kamma? The Buddha said: "Oh monks, it is volition that I call kamma." The popular meaning of kamma is action or doing, but as a technical term, kamma means volition or will. When you do something, there is volition behind it, and that volition, that mental effort, is called kamma. The Buddha explained that, having willed, one then acts through body, speech, and mind. Whatever you do, there is some kind of kamma, mental effort, will, and volition. Volition is one of the fifty-two mental states which arise together with consciousness.
wheel001.pdf
wheel001.pdfThe Seven Factors of Enlightenment1131 viewsThe Tipitaka, the Buddhist canon, is replete with references to the factors of enlightenment expounded by the Enlightened One on different occasions under different circumstances. In the Book of the Kindred Sayings, V (Saíyutta Nikáya, Mahá Vagga) we find a special section under the title Bojjhaóga Saíyutta wherein the Buddha discourses on the Seven Factors of Enlightenment in diverse ways. In this section we read a series of three discourses or sermons recited by Buddhists since the time of the Buddha as a protection (paritta or pirit) against pain, disease, and adversity.
wheel105.pdf
wheel105.pdfThe Four Nutriments of Life - An Anthology of Buddhist Texts788 viewsAll being subsist on nutriment” — this, according to the Buddha, is the one single fact about life that, above all, deserves to be remembered, contemplated and understood. If understood widely and deeply enough, this saying of the Buddha reveals indeed a truth that leads to the root of all existence and also to its uprooting. Here, too, the Buddha proved to be one who “saw to the root of things”. Hence, it was thought useful to collect his utterances on the subject of nutriment, together with the instructive explanations by the teachers of old, the commentators of the Páli scriptures.
wheel271.pdf
wheel271.pdfBag of Bones - A Miscellany on the Body805 viewsThe body is thought to be most obviously “me,” what I regard as the most tangible part of myself. Around it therefore are constructed many views, all of them distorted to some extent, which prevent insight arising into the body as it really is. This book is a small anthology relating to the body in various ways, and presents material which, if contemplated by the earnest and sincere student of Dhamma, will eventually provide fruitful insight and, thereby, freedom from the many desires and fears centered on the body.
wheel273.pdf
wheel273.pdfAnanda the Guardian of the Dhamma786 viewsAnanda’s praise has been voiced on many occasions in the Páli Canon. The greatest recognition for a monk would surely have been when the Buddha asked him to substitute for him as a teacher and then later confirmed that he, himself, would not have presented the teachings in any other way. This praise was given by the Exalted One to Sáriputta (another famous disciple) and to Ánanda.
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