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FromGrasping.pdf
FromGrasping.pdfFrom Grasping to Emptiness (2)1716 viewsExcursions into the Thought-world of the Pali Discourses

The present book is based on revised versions of entries originally published in the Encyclopaedia of Buddhism, Sri Lanka. It forms the second volume of my "Excursions into the Thought-world of the Pali discourses", complementing the previously published "From Craving to Liberation".
May 01, 2010
FromCraving.pdf
FromCraving.pdfFrom Craving to Liberation (1)1826 viewsExcursions into the Thought-world of the Pali Discourses

The essays collected in the present book are revised versions of entries originally published in the Encyclopaedia of Buddhism, Sri Lanka. My main emphasis in each case is on exploring a particular term from the perspective of the early Pali discourses, while other sources − be these later Pali works, Chinese parallels, or secondary publications on the matter at hand − are taken into consideration only in a supplementary fashion.
Apr 30, 2010
a_taste_of_salt(2).pdf
a_taste_of_salt(2).pdfA Taste of Salt2954 viewsThe Sutta Pitaka was written down in the Pali language over 2,000 years ago. The Sutta Pitaka is made of five collections of suttas; the Digha Nikaya, the Majjima Nikaya, the Samyutta Nikaya, the Anguttara Nikaya, and the Khuddaka Nikaya. These texts remain the most complete record of early Buddhist teachings. The suttas fill thousands of pages, and it is a daunting task for most readers to read through the many volumes. A Taste of Salt draws 350 pages containing the central teachings of the Buddha from the roughly 5,000 pages of the Sutta Pitaka. The purpose of this collection is to make these essential texts more accessible to meditators and students of Buddhism.Apr 29, 2010
First_Discourse-Comparison_of_Versions.pdf
First_Discourse-Comparison_of_Versions.pdfThe Buddha's First Discourse: a Comparision of Versions1758 viewsThis is a study of the Dhammacakka-Pavattana-Sutta, officially considered the first discourse of the Buddha. The tradition acknowledges that he spoke about his teaching before the occasion of the delivery of this discourse. This study was undertaken during my Buddhist studies, which was one major of my Batchelor of Arts at the University of Queensland, completed in 2004. The study compares 17 possible versions of this discourse from four languages: Pali, Chinese, Tibetan and Sanskrit. Some interesting differences are discovered and an attempt is made to explain them. An expected core of all the discourses stands out, which shows why all major schools of Buddhism accept the Four Noble Truths as the essential teaching of the Buddha.Dec 29, 2009
73_Knowledges.pdf
73_Knowledges.pdfWisdom and the Seventy-Three Kinds of Knowledge2375 viewsThe 'Seventy-Three Kinds of Knowledge' appear as a
Summary or Table of Contents (matika) in the first Treatise
on Knowledge (matika-katha) of the Canonical book Patis-
ambhida-magga (translated by Bhikkhu Nanamoli as "The
Path of Discrimination", PTS ed. 1982).
Apr 25, 2009
ananda1.pdf
ananda1.pdfBuddha's Constant Companion - Ven. Ananda1920 viewsby Ven. Weragoda Sarada Maha Thero

In this life of the Buddha's personal attendant, Venerable Ananda, we see that in his character and outlook, Ananda was touchingly and movingly human. This was partly because of his simple and charming behaviour, and his ever-present readiness to help anyone who was in distress or difficulty. In spite of his administrative and organisational responsibilities as the Buddha's attendant, Ananda displayed a deep intellectuality and a profound grasp of abstruse philosophic concepts.
Mar 01, 2009
iabu_journal.pdf
iabu_journal.pdfThe Journal of the International Association of Buddhist Universities1402 viewsThe journal of the International Association of Buddhist UniversitiesJan 01, 1970
gratitude.pdf
gratitude.pdfGratitude in the Buddha’s Teachings1674 viewsThis text, with an introduction on the subject of gratitude in the Buddha's Teachings has extacts from Pali Suttas on Gratitude and Suttas on Ingratitude. In the Mangala Sutta, the Buddha declares that the quality of gratitude to be one of the highest blessings, thus showing how it plays a key role in His ethical and spiritual teachings.Jan 01, 1970
10_ways_of_making_merit.pdf
10_ways_of_making_merit.pdfTen Ways of Making Merit3618 viewsThe Buddha taught that merit-making is a formidable antidote to overcome the many vicissitudes faced in our day-to-day lives. Hence He declared: ‘Do not fear merit-making. “Merit-making” is a term denoting happiness, what is desirable, pleasant, dear and charming. For I recall in my mind very well that after making merit for a long time, I experienced desirable, pleasant, dear and charming results for a long time. Let therefore a man train himself in merit-making that yields long-lasting happiness. Let him cultivate the practice of giving, virtuous conduct and a mind of metta. By cultivating these qualities the wise man arrives in untroubled and happy states.Jan 01, 1970
73_knowledges.pdf
73_knowledges.pdfSeventy-Three Kinds of Knowledge2457 viewsVen. Nyanadassana, Bhikkhu

Since these knowledges are, as a Summary, very briefly stated,the present translation has explanatory notes in order to facilitate the reader understand them, at least intellectually, more easily. These explanations are based on the Pañisambhid -magga, the Visuddhi-magga and their corresponding Commentaries, and their references are clearly distinguished. The translation of each knowledge
is repeated in the Notes, in bold, for convenient reading.
Jan 01, 1970
127 files on 13 page(s) 8

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