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03_texts_and_practices.pdf
03_texts_and_practices.pdfTexts and Practices2387 views
The Suttas are chants, and are full of repetitions. When we look at the patterns of repetitions we discover something quite familiar to us: verses and chorus. Let us take some path text and use it to illustrate the problem we are talking about, and suggest another way of reading these texts that takes into account their oral structure as outlined above: Atthakanagara Sutta (M52) and Culasunnata Sutta: Smaller discourse on emptiness (M121)
11111
(3 votes)
Panca_Sila_Pali_Canon.pdf
Panca_Sila_Pali_Canon.pdfPanca Sila (The Five Precepts) in The Pali Canon1293 viewsIn some suttas only the first four precepts are mentioned, whereas all five precepts are described together in other suttas. The first four precepts are pakati-sila whereas the fifth precept is pannati-sila. Venerable Nyanatiloka explains in his Buddhist Dictionary that pakati-sila [is] natural or genuine morality, [which] is distinct from those outward rules of conduct laid down for either laymen or monks. Those latter are the so-called prescribed morality (pannatti-sila).
Suttas which include The Five Precepts are listed.
11111
(1 votes)
Maung_-_Buddhism_and_the_Self.pdf
Maung_-_Buddhism_and_the_Self.pdfBuddhism and the Self1113 viewsOne of the most perplexing concepts in Buddhist philosophy is the doctrine of anatta, or ‘not-self’. Many have interpreted anatta to be a metaphysical assertion that there is no self, but I argue that this is mistaken. Rather, in line with Thanissaro Bhikkhu, I understand anatta as a practical strategy that has heuristic value in guiding one
towards liberation. Furthermore, I propose that the acceptance of a subjective self can be consistent with and justified in Buddhism. This will be the focus of this essay.
11111
(1 votes)
upanisa_sutta.pdf
upanisa_sutta.pdfTranscendental Dependent Arising2070 viewsBhikkhu Bodhi

Dependent Arising (paticcasamuppada) is the central principle of the Buddha's teaching, constituting both the objective content of its liberating insight and the germinative source for its vast network of doctrines and disciplines. So crucial is this principle to the body of the Buddha's doctrine that an insight into dependent arising is held to be sufficient to yield an understanding of the entire teaching. In the words of the Buddha: He who sees dependent arising sees the Dhamma; he who sees the Dhamma sees dependent arising.
11111
(1 votes)
thera-chifuner.pdf
thera-chifuner.pdfTheravadin Buddhist Chinese Funeral1298 viewsGenerally, a Chinese funeral is a mixture of Taoist, Confucian and Buddhist rites. How then should a Theravadin Buddhist funeral be conducted? Venerable Suvanno, a respected and senior Theravadin Buddhist monk of Chinese descent explains how a Theravadin Buddhist Chinese funeral may be conducted.11111
(2 votes)
kathina.pdf
kathina.pdfKathina: Then and Now1294 viewsThe kathina ceremony is now an internationally established celebration where the Sangha and the laity meet to participate in mutually rewarding, meritorious activities. Throughout the centuries, the way of carrying out the ceremony has changed with local interpretations, practices and customs. How much has deviated from the original scriptural tradition - how much is in accordance with the scriptures and how much is mere invention? In this booklet, Venerable Aggacitta Bhikkhu combines his scriptural knowledge and practical experience to scrutinise the kathina ceremony through two articles: The Scriptural Tradition of Kathina; Kathina Benefits - Illusion, Delusion and Resolution.11111
(2 votes)
noinnercore.pdf
noinnercore.pdfNo Inner Core1539 viewsAnatta is a Pali word consisting of a negative prefix, "an" meaning not, plus atta, soul, and is most literally translated as no-soul. The word atta, however, has a wide range of meanings, and some of those meanings cross over into the fields of psychology, philosophy, and everyday terminology, as, for example, when atta can mean self, being, ego, and personality. Therefore, we will examine and elucidate the wide range of meanings which atta can signify in order to determine exactly what the Buddha denied when He proclaimed that He teaches anatt?, that is, when He denied the existence of atta. We will examine both Buddhist and non-Buddhist definitions of the term soul, and we will also examine modern definitions of terms such as ego and self.00000
(1 votes)
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