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Top rated - Theravada Texts
bhkkrule.pdf
bhkkrule.pdfThe Bhikkhus' Rules - Guide for Laypeople3029 viewsThe Theravadin Buddhist Monk's Rules by compiled and explained by Bhikkhu Ariyesako. Some may think that this lineage follows an overly traditionalist approach but then, it does happen to be the oldest living tradition. A slight caution therefore to anyone completely new to the ways of monasticism, which may appear quite radical for the modern day and age. The best introduction, perhaps essential for a true understanding, is meeting with a practising bhikkhu who should manifest and reflect the peaceful and joyous qualities of the bhikkhu's way of life.44444
(6 votes)
paliwordday.pdf
paliwordday.pdfA Pali Word A Day3015 viewsA selection of Pali words for daily reflection. This booklet aims to assist new Buddhist students who are unfamiliar with some of the Pali words often used in the study of Buddhism. As the title suggests, it encourages the learning and use of Pali words by learning one word a day. This booklet can serve both as a dictionary and a glossary of terms for your reference.44444
(4 votes)
Samyutta-Nikaya-An-Anthology-I.pdf
Samyutta-Nikaya-An-Anthology-I.pdfSaṃyutta Nikāya An Anthology - Part I1683 viewsThe Saṃyutta Nikāya is one of the five great divisions of the Sutta Piṭaka of the Pāli canon, the Tipiṭaka or “Three Baskets” of doctrine, constituting the Buddha-word for Theravāda
Buddhism. The meaning of “Saṃyutta Nikāya” is “The Collection of Grouped Discourses” and it is so called because its material is arranged into groups (saṃyuttas) according to subject, of which there are fifty-six. These again are placed into five vaggas, sections or chapters, corresponding to the five divisions of this anthology
44444
(4 votes)
02_the_oral_tradition.pdf
02_the_oral_tradition.pdfThe Oral Tradition2133 views
Lists, lists of lists, and lists within lists. Creativity, meditation and the list. Examining some suttas which illustrates the performance and networking aspect of the Suttas: Samanas and brahmanas and the Mahahatthipadopama Sutta: Large Discourse on the Elephant's Footprint (M28)
44444
(4 votes)
bmc2.pdf
bmc2.pdfThe Buddhist Monastic Code II1504 viewsThe Khandhaka Rules Translated and Explained

This volume is an attempt to give an organized, detailed account of the training rules found in the Khandhakas that govern the life of bhikkhus, together with the traditions that have grown up around them. It is a companion to The Buddhist Monastic Code, Volume One (BMC1), which offers a similar treatment of the Patimokkha training rules.
44444
(2 votes)
Path_of_Freedom_Vimuttimagga.pdf
Path_of_Freedom_Vimuttimagga.pdfThe Path of Freedom / Vimuttimagga 1800 viewsThe work is compiled in accordance with classical Buddhist division of the path into the three stages of virtue, concentration, and wisdom, culminating in the goal of liberation. It is widely believed that the Vimuttimagga may have been the model used by Buddhaghosha to compose his magnum opus, the Visuddhimagga (Path of Purification), several centuries later. The older work is marked by a leaner style and a more lively sense of urgency stemming from its primarily practical orientation.44444
(2 votes)
dhamma-nibbana.pdf
dhamma-nibbana.pdfPractising Dhamma with a View to Nibbana2159 viewsRadhika Abeysekera began teaching and writing books on the Dhamma to help reintroduce Buddhism to immigrants in non-Buddhist countries. The books are designed in such a manner that a parent or educator can use them to teach Buddhism to a child. Mrs. Abeysekera feels strongly that parents should first study and practise the Dhamma to the best of their ability to obtain maximum benefits, because what you do not possess you cannot give to your child. The books were also designed to foster understanding of the Dhamma among non-Buddhists, so that there can be peace and harmony through understanding and respect for the philosophies and faiths of others.44444
(2 votes)
01_intro_dependorig.pdf
01_intro_dependorig.pdf01 Dependent Arising5225 viewsAn introduction to dependent arising, focusing on the three key concepts of specific conditionality, dependent arising and the the dependently arisen.33333
(9 votes)
05_satipatthana_sutta_01.pdf
05_satipatthana_sutta_01.pdf01 Satipatthana Sutta2659 viewsWe have seen how different approaches to translation provide different approaches to the meditation practice itself. Translation, interpretation and practice all take place within communities. One's choices in translation is also an expression of one's identity. If I identify with a specific tradition, I will translate in a way that fits with that tradition's view of the teaching and the practice. If I refuse to identify with a tradition, preferring to go my own way or be part of the creation of a new tradition, this choice also will condition translation and interpretation. And interpretation conditions practice. The practice is defined by its texts, and the texts are formed by translation and interpretation.33333
(5 votes)
ordination.pdf
ordination.pdfOrdination Procedure2418 viewsPali / English

Ordination Procedure, was composed by Somdet Phra Sangharja Pussadeva of Wat Rajapratisahasthitamahasmarama. His Eminence reformed some of the text and procedure for Pabbajja and Upasampada from the original text. The method of Pabbajja (Going-forth) and Upasampada (Acceptance) in the Southern School (that is, Theravada) uses the original Magadha (Pali) language.
33333
(6 votes)
97 files on 10 page(s) 5

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