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Home > eBook Library > Theravada Texts

Top rated - Theravada Texts
milinda.pdf
milinda.pdfThe Debate of King Milinda (The Milanda Panna)2177 viewsThe Milanda Panna is a famous work of Buddhist literature, probably compiled in the 1st century B.C. It presents Buddhist doctrine in a very attractive and memorable form as a dialogue between a Bactrian Greek king, Milinda, who plays the 'Devil's Advocate' and a Buddhist sage, Nagasena. The topics covered include most of the questions commonly asked by Westerners. This abridgement provides a concise presentation of this masterpiece of Buddhist literature.33333
(6 votes)
mission-accomplished.pdf
mission-accomplished.pdfThe Mission Accomplished1567 viewsA historical analysis of the Mahaparinibbana Sutta of the Digha Nikaya of the Pali Canon. The Mission Accomplished is undoubtedly an eye opening contribution to Buddhist analytical Pali studies. In this analytical and critical work Ven. Dr. Pategama Gnanarama enlightens us in many areas of subjects hitherto unexplored by scholars. His views on the beginnings of the Bhikkhuni Order are interesting and refreshing. They might even be provocative to traditional readers, yet be challenging to the feminists to adopt a most positive attitude to the problem. Prof. Chandima Wijebandara, University of Sri Jayawardhanapura, Sri Lanka.33333
(6 votes)
damachak.pdf
damachak.pdfDhammacakkappavattana Sutta3964 viewsVen. Mahasi Sayadaw

The First Discourse of the Buddha, namely the Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta, commonly known as the Great Discourse on the Wheel of Dhamma. This is a series of discourses on the Dhammacakka Sutta by the late Venerable Mahasi Sayadaw, a Questioner at the Sixth Buddhist Council in Myanmar, (Burma) 1954. Translated by U Ko Lay.
33333
(6 votes)
geth0401.pdf
geth0401.pdfCan Killing a Living Being Ever Be an Act of Compassion?2854 viewsThe analysis of the act of killing in the Abhidhamma & Pali Commentaries.

Abstract: In the Theravadin exegetical tradition, the notion that intentionally killing a living being is wrong involves a claim that when certain mental states (such as compassion) are present in the mind, it is simply impossible that one could act in certain ways (such as to intentionally kill). Contrary to what Keown has claimed, the only criterion for judging whether an act is “moral” (kusala) or “immoral” (akusala) in Indian systematic Buddhist thought is the quality of the intention that motivates it. The idea that killing a living being might be a solution to the problem of suffering runs counter to the Buddhist emphasis on dukkha as a reality that must be understood. The cultivation of friendliness in the face of suffering is seen as something that can bring beneficial effects for self and others in a situation where it might seem that compassion should lead one to kill.
33333
(3 votes)
04_vibhanga.pdf
04_vibhanga.pdf04 Dependent Arising: Vibhanga2652 viewsLooking at the standard "twelvefold formula" of dependent arising,and the question of life-after-life, or "rebirth.33333
(3 votes)
ctp_book_v1.pdf
ctp_book_v1.pdfClearing the Path1780 viewsNOTE: Primarily the PDF CtPbookV1.pdf is made to be printed as a book. Other versions of this PDF are modified to be better viewed on screen - whilst another is already pre-printed in PDF format as a 2-up meaning that there are 2 pages per A4 Landscape oriented page to make for easier printout (on A4 paper) for personal use.33333
(3 votes)
dhammapada_illustrated.zip
dhammapada_illustrated.zipTreasury of Truth1902 viewsThis is the Illustrated version of the Dhammapada or Treasury of Truth, compiled by Venerable Weragoda Sarada Maha Thero.33333
(3 votes)
damapada.pdf
damapada.pdfThe Dhammapada, a Translation2606 viewsVen. Thanissaro, Bhikkhu

The Dhammapada has long been recognized as one of the masterpieces of early Buddhist literature. Only more recently have scholars realized that it is also one of the early masterpieces of the Indian tradition of Kavya, or belles lettres. This translation is an attempt to render the verses into English in a way that does justice to both of the traditions to which the text belongs. Although it is tempting to view these traditions as distinct, dealing with form (Kavya) and content (Buddhism), the ideals of Kavya aimed at combining form and content into a seamless whole.
33333
(7 votes)
73_knowledges.pdf
73_knowledges.pdfSeventy-Three Kinds of Knowledge2576 viewsVen. Nyanadassana, Bhikkhu

Since these knowledges are, as a Summary, very briefly stated,the present translation has explanatory notes in order to facilitate the reader understand them, at least intellectually, more easily. These explanations are based on the Pañisambhid -magga, the Visuddhi-magga and their corresponding Commentaries, and their references are clearly distinguished. The translation of each knowledge
is repeated in the Notes, in bold, for convenient reading.
33333
(4 votes)
volition.pdf
volition.pdfVolition and the Law of Kamma1667 viewsWhat is kamma? The Buddha said: "Oh monks, it is volition that I call kamma." The popular meaning of kamma is action or doing, but as a technical term, kamma means volition or will. When you do something, there is volition behind it, and that volition, that mental effort, is called kamma. The Buddha explained that, having willed, one then acts through body, speech, and mind. Whatever you do, there is some kind of kamma, mental effort, will, and volition. Volition is one of the fifty-two mental states which arise together with consciousness.33333
(4 votes)
97 files on 10 page(s) 6

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