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73_Knowledges.pdf
73_Knowledges.pdfWisdom and the Seventy-Three Kinds of Knowledge2470 viewsThe 'Seventy-Three Kinds of Knowledge' appear as a
Summary or Table of Contents (matika) in the first Treatise
on Knowledge (matika-katha) of the Canonical book Patis-
ambhida-magga (translated by Bhikkhu Nanamoli as "The
Path of Discrimination", PTS ed. 1982).
33333
(6 votes)
First_Discourse-Comparison_of_Versions.pdf
First_Discourse-Comparison_of_Versions.pdfThe Buddha's First Discourse: a Comparision of Versions1834 viewsThis is a study of the Dhammacakka-Pavattana-Sutta, officially considered the first discourse of the Buddha. The tradition acknowledges that he spoke about his teaching before the occasion of the delivery of this discourse. This study was undertaken during my Buddhist studies, which was one major of my Batchelor of Arts at the University of Queensland, completed in 2004. The study compares 17 possible versions of this discourse from four languages: Pali, Chinese, Tibetan and Sanskrit. Some interesting differences are discovered and an attempt is made to explain them. An expected core of all the discourses stands out, which shows why all major schools of Buddhism accept the Four Noble Truths as the essential teaching of the Buddha.33333
(4 votes)
ctp_screen-view-v1.pdf
ctp_screen-view-v1.pdfClearing the Path1893 viewsNOTE: There are 3 versions of Clearing the Path. This version is made for screen viewing and is very similar to the book version. However it is not designed to be printed because the pages are not a standard size (the pages have been cropped for easier screen viewing). It cannot be expected that this material, which poses a clear challenge to the mainstream version of Buddhism, will gain any great popularity among the majority of Buddhists - Eastern or Western - but at least it can suggest an alternative approach to the Buddha's original Teaching, and perhaps serve as a useful eye-opener for those seeking an understanding of its more fundamental principles.33333
(4 votes)
roots_goodevil.pdf
roots_goodevil.pdfThe Roots of Good and Evil1458 viewsGreed, hatred, and delusion - these are the three bad roots in us. Conversely the good ones are non-greed (i.e generosity), non-hatred (love), and non-delusion (wisdom). All our troubles and suffering stem essentially from the bad roots while our joy and happiness comes from the good ones. It is important to know and understand these roots if we are going to make an end of suffering and attain true peace and happiness. This book explains in a penetrative way the nature of these six roots. It contains discourses of the Buddha on the subject together with traditional commentarial explanations.33333
(2 votes)
01_how_can_we_read.pdf
01_how_can_we_read.pdfReading the Suttas: How Can We Read?4382 viewsIntroduction. What is a sutta?

How would we read the Nikayas if we were academics?
How would we read the Nikayas if we were practitioners?

A study of the Kalama Sutta. This sutta is one of the most quoted in Western Buddhism, and the most quoted part of it is the section beginning:

“Kàlàmas, for you to doubt, to be uncertain; uncertainty has arisen in a doubtful matter. Do not rely upon what has been acquired by repeated tradition; nor upon lineage; nor upon rumour; nor upon what is handed down in the teachings; nor upon logic; nor upon inference; nor upon a consideration of reasons; nor upon a delight in speculation; nor upon appearances; nor upon respect for your teacher. Kàlàmas, when you know for yourselves: These things are unskilful; these things are blameable; these things are censured by the wise; undertaken and observed, these things lead to harm and suffering,’ then abandon them”.
22222
(8 votes)
teachings_chah.pdf
teachings_chah.pdfThe Teachings of Ajahn Chah1586 viewsThe following Dhamma books of Ajahn Chah have been included in this collection of Ajahn Chah's Dhamma talks: Bodhinyana (1982); A Taste of Freedom (fifth impression.2002); Living Dhamma (1992); Food for the Heart (1992); The Path to Peace (1996); Clarity of Insight (2000); Unshakeable Peace (2003); Everything is Teaching Us (2004). Also some as yet unpublished talks have been included in the last section called `More Dhamma Talks'. We hope our efforts in compiling this collection of Dhamma talks of Ajahn Chah will be of benefit. (Wat Pah Nanachat)22222
(6 votes)
sigalovada.pdf
sigalovada.pdfSigalovada Sutta - Illustrated2529 viewsVen. K. Dhammasiri

The Sigalovada in Pictures. A Pictorial presentation of the Buddha's advice to the layman, Sigala on the duties of the householder. Compiled by Venerable K. Dhammasiri. Artwork by K. W. Janaranjana.
22222
(5 votes)
04_anapanasati_sutta.pdf
04_anapanasati_sutta.pdfThe Anapanasati Sutta3401 viewsThe Anapanasati Sutta is not an easy read, although the language itself is quite simple. But its structure is complex and dense, and this complexity raises serious questions about interpretation. The complexity of the structure creates ambiguity. Even the orthodox commentary sees certain passages as capable of different but simultaneous readings, referring to either serenity or insight practice depending on what approach to the practice the practitioner is taking.

We can see how Thich Nhat Hanh can take liberties with the text, but he does so to make the practice explained within it more accessible to ordinary lay people. Are we to assume that this was not the intention of the original compilers? Or can we see the complexity of the sutta as evidence of an attempt to create a discourse that different communities of practitioners could, quite legitimately, read in different ways? In any event, if we are to make sense of this sutta, and extract from it what it has to offer in terms of guidance on the practice, we need to read the structure of the text. It is not just the surface words that convey meaning, but the underlying networks that link the words.
22222
(4 votes)
06_seeing_&_understanding.pdf
06_seeing_&_understanding.pdf06 Dependent Arising: Applying to Insight Meditation2429 viewsApplying Dependent Arising to Insight meditation.22222
(4 votes)
vandana.pdf
vandana.pdfBhavana Vandana - Book of Devotion2878 viewsThe purpose of this book is manifold. One is to teach the users of this Vandana book how to pronounce Pali words correctly. By the daily repetition of these Pali verses and Suttas people can learn the Pali pronunciation without much effort. Secondly we intend to teach people the Pali language without much toil. Therefore we made one half of our chanting in English, so people learn the meaning of what they chant in Pali and later on they can compare the English with the Pali. Thirdly, we intend to teach people Dhamma through devotional service. In order to fulfill all these purposes we decided to include certain Suttas which are not normally used in Viharas for vandana service.
22222
(2 votes)
97 files on 10 page(s) 8

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