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Home > eBook Library > Buddhist Meditation > Vipassana - Insight Meditation > Practicing Vipassana Meditation - by Ven. Pannyavaro

01Practicing_Vipassana.pdf
01Practicing_Vipassana.pdfPracticing Vipassana Meditation2698 viewsMany people all over the world are now practicing the Buddhist meditation known as Vipassana or Insight Meditation. Western psychotherapies have taken it up as ‘mindfulness’ as well as ordinary people who have found it beneficial in coping with the stresses and strains of modern life. While many are increasingly taking time out to attend retreats in Vipassana meditation centres. So this series of text will take you the basic practice.
02Orientation_to_the_Practice.pdf
02Orientation_to_the_Practice.pdfOrientation to the Practice1546 viewsWhether this is a first time experience of Vipassana meditation or you are a meditator who has experience in this mode of practice, every meditator at the beginning of a retreat will need to make some adjustment to the retreat situation - at least in having to settle down and get into the rhythm of the practice. First, let us look how one relates to a retreat situation and the way to adjust to the retreat environment, before the basic instructions are given.
03Basic_Instructions.pdf
03Basic_Instructions.pdfBasic Instructions for Vipassana Meditation 2079 viewsFrom the beginning and throughout the practice sessions the strategies and fundamentals of Vipassana meditation will be given so that you become well established in the essentials of the techniques involved. Then it is important that the meditator understands the practice in its context. So a frame of reference is necessary, in the form of a framework to the practice as given by the Buddha in his teaching in the Satipatthana Sutta or the discourse on The Four Foundations of Mindfulness.
04Interview_-_What_to_Report.pdf
04Interview_-_What_to_Report.pdfWhat to Report in an Interview1124 viewsOnce the beginner is established in the basic techniques, students are then required to report their experience to the teacher in a formal interview throughout the retreat. The interview is the basis for the relationship between the teacher and the student. It is crucial for the development of Vipassana meditation as it is where the meditator reports his or her experience and can be guided and given further instructions if need be by the teacher.
05Guidelines_for_the_Practice.pdf
05Guidelines_for_the_Practice.pdfGuidelines for the Practice1323 viewsNow that you have been give the basic instructions and are doing the exercises to develop the practice, it is necessary to have an overview and a framework of
the practice to guide you. In order to do this, we need to go back to the source material of the Buddha’s set of instructions on Vipassana meditation: The Four Foundations of Mindfulness.
06Questions-and-Responses_.pdf
06Questions-and-Responses_.pdfQuestions and Responses1191 viewsThere are three areas of difficulties that most meditators experience when first doing the practice: incessant thinking, disinclination or inability to handle pain, and sleepiness. In addition to the explanation to the difficulties facing meditators, here are some commonly asked questions – often on practical issues - by new students, and my responses to them. I hope they can help to clarify and elaborate on the practice as a standardised set of instructions is usually given to beginners, which needs then to be explained further to the individual meditator as they practice.
07Support_of_Loving-kindness.pdf
07Support_of_Loving-kindness.pdfSupport of Loving-kindness Meditation1130 viewsAfter the meditator is established in the basics of Vipassana meditation, Loving-kindness meditation can be used to support the more challenging Vipassana practice. While this is switching meditation modes to a concentration-based practice, its benefit is that it uplifts and sweetens the mind and helps meditators to cope with negative emotions that they may not yet be able to deal with in their Vipassana practice.
08Taking_the_Practice_Home.pdf
08Taking_the_Practice_Home.pdfTaking the Practice Home1310 viewsIf meditation is to have any relevance to everyday life it has to be done at home. This does not mean just your residence but wherever your attention happens to reside. To meditate at home requires a 'hands-on', dynamic approach that is not restricted to any particular time, place or posture. When applied in this way, it becomes integrated into the ordinary activities of life and becomes the basis for a meditative lifestyle in the home and the routine of everyday life.
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